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Caesar's cipher - online encryption and decryption

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Caesar's code, also known as shift cipher, Caesar's code or Caesar's shift - One of the simplest and most widely known encryption methods.

Caesar’s cipher is a kind of substitution cipher in which each character in plaintext is replaced by a character located at a constant number of positions to the left or right of it in the alphabet. For example, in a cipher with a shift of 3 A would be replaced by G, B would become D, and so on.

The transformation used is usually referred to as ROTN, where N is the shift, ROT is the abbreviation of the word ROTATE, in this case “cyclic shift”. The number of different transformations is finite and depends on the length of the alphabet. 32 different conversions are possible for the Russian language (the ROT0 and ROT33 transformations preserve the source text, and then repetitions begin).

Caesar cipher with a shift of 3 (English alphabet):

A is replaced by D

B is replaced by E

Z is replaced by C

The code is named after the Roman emperor Guy Julius Caesar, who used it for secret correspondence with his generals.

How to decrypt Caesar's code

Caesar's code - - [http://www.rfcmd.ru/glossword/1.8/index.php?a=index d = 23] Topics information protection EN Caesar cipher ... Technical translator's guide

Tritemius Code - Tritemius cipher is an encryption system developed by Johann Tritemius. It is an advanced Caesar cipher, that is, a substitution cipher. According to the encryption algorithm, each message character is shifted by a character lagging behind the given ... ... Wikipedia

Wildcard cipher - each character of the plaintext replaces with some other. In classical cryptography, four types of substitution ciphers are distinguished: Single-alphabet substitution cipher (simple substitution cipher) cipher, in which each character of the plaintext ... ... Wikipedia

Replacement code - The substitution cipher replaces each plaintext character with some other. In classical cryptography, four types of substitution ciphers are distinguished: Single-alphabet substitution cipher (simple replacement cipher) cipher, in which each character is open ... ... Wikipedia

3 shift cipher - Caesar’s cipher - [http://www.rfcmd.ru/glossword/1.8/index.php?a=index&d=4353] Topics information security Synonyms Caesar’s cipher EN shift by three cipherCaesar cipher ... Technical translator's guide

cipher - n., M., Upotr. cf. often Morphology: (no) what? cipher, why? cipher, (see) what? cipher, what? cipher, what about? about the cipher, many what? ciphers, (no) why? ciphers, why? ciphers, (see) what? ciphers than? ciphers, what about? about ciphers 1. A cipher is called ... ... Dmitriev's Explanatory Dictionary

Easy replacement cipher - The principle of Caesar’s cipher is to “shift” letters by 3 positions. To decrypt, you need to perform the reverse operation ... Wikipedia

Playfer Code - The Playfer encryption system was invented by Charles Wheatstone, who first described it in 1854 ... Wikipedia

Playfair Cipher - The Playfer encryption system was invented by Charles Wheatstone, who first described it in 1854. The Pleyfer cipher or the Pleyfer square is a manual symmetric encryption technique in which the replacement of bigrams was first used. Invented in 1854 ... ... Wikipedia

Cipher - (from the French. Chiffre "number", from the Arabic. صفر [şifara] "zero") - a way to change the letters or their location in the text, writing system or letter attributes in order to hide the transmitted message from unwanted users. The word "number" is entered into ... ... Grammar dictionary

How to encrypt

Suppose we want to encrypt the word Russia. Let's see how Caesar’s cipher can be used for this. To begin with, recall the Russian alphabet and number the letters in order.

So, our word is Russia. Let's try to encrypt it. To do this, we need to decide on the encryption step. The encryption step or shift is a number that indicates how many positions we will shift to the left or right alphabetically. Often the shift is called the key. It can be chosen arbitrarily. In our example, we choose a step equal to 7. Thus, we will shift each letter of the encrypted word to the right (towards the end of the alphabet) by 7 positions. The letter P has number 18. We add our step to 18 and get 25. So, in the encrypted word, instead of the letter P, there will be a letter with the number 25 - Ch. The letter o will turn into the letter x. Letter C - W and so on. As a result, after encryption, the word Russia will turn into Chhshshpo.

By setting the encryption step, any text can be encrypted.

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